Free Code Camp

A friend recommended a new free coding resource for learning full-stack development called Free Code Camp. I’ve been trying out their lessons the past two days to see how they are. I’m very impressed with their community, network, organization, and support. They don’t teach Ruby and Ruby on Rails, which is what I’ve been learning the past few months. Instead they focus more on JavaScript and Node.js.

This is what their curriculum looks like:

800 Hours of Practice:

    800 Hours of  Real World Work Experience:

  • 100-hour Nonprofit Project
  • 200-hour Nonprofit Project #1
  • 200-hour Nonprofit Project #2
  • 300-hour Nonprofit Project

I really love the idea that you can work on some real-world non-profit projects after you complete their lessons. It’s great to get real experience and add a project to your portfolio. I don’t know any other free or paid coding school that gives you such a great opportunity.

Their HTML and CSS portion was fairly easy to go through and it was a great review since I had learned it earlier in the year. Their jQuery and JavaScript lessons use Codecademy, so you will still need to go between the two websites. I’m currently going through the Free Code Camp JavaScript so we’ll see how their subsequent lessons fair.

Free Code Camp is also on LinkedIn as an education institute and they encourage you to add them to your LinkedIn profile. Also check out Free Code Camp on Github. They are also on Facebook. I joined the Atlanta chapter.

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Codermanual – Part V finished

I’ve just finished Part V of Codermanual, the JavaScript & jQuery section. It was an oversimplification of the language, I feel, but the way it was explained, really helped me wrap my head around how programming languages work. The amount of information in this part was overwhelming, but I feel confident now that I can handle JavaScript.

I had tried to learn JavaScript on my own back in April but I was using Codecademy at that time and I think their JavaScript tutorial was way too advanced. Everything went over my head. It was my first time learning an object-oriented programming language. Around the same time, I kept hearing a lot about Ruby and Ruby on Rails so I tried Codecademy’s Ruby course instead and found it much easier to grasp so I stuck with it and am now working on Michael Hartl’s Ruby on Rails tutorial.

I’m halfway through and realizing that there are still many things about Ruby that I have questions about, so I’m going to pause Hartl’s tutorial as well as Codermanual and do The Odin Project’s Ruby Programming course (which is also free!).

The more I learn, the more I realize how little I know.

Coder Manual

Today is day 2 of the Coder Manual lessons. I ended up paying the $39 price from Stacksocial for the online CoderManual course by Rob Dey, which was originally $399. At $39 and with lifetime access to the material, I didn’t think it was a bad investment.

I completed Phase 1 and Part 1 yesterday. Today I will be doing the Part 2 videos. So far the videos are pretty easy to follow and not too long so as to lose focus. Rob explains things in an easy to understand manner and it’s been great following along. As great as that sounds, Phase 1 was just an intro to computers and the internet, and Part 1 was just making sure you had the necessary software installed, so it wasn’t much in-depth coding. We’ll see how Part 2 is today.

Will keep you posted!